Sun, 30 Jan

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Film Screening

Belfast Films - Brink | Epilogue | Hunter Filmed

In a first, the @Belfast International Arts Festival, Northern Ireland’s leading international arts festival dedicated to contemlaporary performance, media and visual arts collaborates with Attakkalari India Biennial for a special showcase of five dance films.

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Belfast Films - Brink | Epilogue | Hunter Filmed

TIME & LOCATION

30 Jan, 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Film Screening

ABOUT THE EVENT

You can call this event a meeting of two celebrated festivals from two different corners of the world. In a first, the @Belfast International Arts Festival, Northern Ireland’s leading international arts festival dedicated to contemporary performance, media and visual arts collaborates with Attakkalari India Biennial for a special showcase of five dance films that have been made in Ireland and are being screened in India.

From the life and experiences of aging dancers to the politics of Brexit and life during a pandemic, the films tackle a myriad subjects with dance as the common language.  About the films:  Brink (25 mins)             Brink, directed by Belfast choreographer Eileen McClory*, was created as a response to the tension, frustration and division caused by the Brexit vote. It exposes the futile, frustrating and divisive nature of high-risk negotiations where everything is 'on the table' and even the smallest mistake could be fatal.  Epilogue (25 mins) Epilogue was created and devised from the lived experience and personal reflections of professional dancers, Jane Mooney and Sandy Cuthbert. The film by Eileen McClory* is a frank reflection of what dance took from and gave to the performers throughout their careers, and what happens when the curtain comes down and the applause has faded.  *Eileen McClory was commissioned to make Brink and Epilogue by Maiden Voyage Dance.   Hunter Filmed (36 mins) Directed by dancer and choreographer Oona Doherty, this film trilogy is a new cinematic mutation; a poetic exploration of working-class masculinity, urban decay and organised religion, all told from the frenetic point of view of the dancer.  The film was commissioned by Art Night and Fact in collaboration with 180 Studios.

Due to music rights restrictions, screening is limited to audiences in India.